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January 2003

2002: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December
2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August[?] - September[?] - October[?] - November[?] - December[?]

A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003.

See also:

Table of contents

January 31, 2003

January 30, 2003

  • Would-be shoe-bomber Richard Reid is sentenced to life in prison for trying to down an American Airlines flight from Paris to Miami. Reid had previously pleaded guilty. [1] (http://apnews.excite.com/article/20030130/D7OSP55G0)

January 29, 2003

January 28, 2003

  • An election in the state of Oregon to pass an temporary three-year income tax failed with 54% of the votes voting against and 44% voting for. This forced the first layoffs in the Oregon State Police[?] since its creation in 1934, and other actions including cutbacks in many of the local school districts.

January 26, 2003

January 25, 2003

January 24, 2003

January 22, 2003

  • The RIAA, a music industry lobbying group, announces that Hilary Rosen will step down as head of the organization at the end of 2003. Rosen achieved notoriety on the Internet for her prolific efforts to halt the spread of copyrighted mp3 recordings on peer to peer file sharing networks such as Napster and Kazaa. Reports indicate that the members of the RIAA are unhappy with Rosen's nearly total failure to achieve this goal. [2] (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A30286-2003Jan22)
  • Elections for the Tweede Kamer, the main chamber of parliament of The Netherlands. The PvdA wins, but CDA remains the largest party in parliament. LPF loses. CDA and VVD do not get a majority.
  • A large arctic air mass over much of central North America brings severe cold and wind chill over much of southern Canada and northern United States for several days.
  • Germany and France celebrate the 40. anniversary of their friendship in Versailles (Elysée Contract).

January 21, 2003

  • An earthquake hits Mexico that is 7.6 on the Richter scale. The center of the earthquake was on located on the Pacific coast, in the State of Colima. Even in Mexico City, the capital 400 kilometres away from the center of the earthquake, the earthquake was felt.
  • Convicted cracker Kevin Mitnick is allowed to use a computer again.

January 20, 2003

  • Finsbury Park mosque in Finsbury Park, London, England, often associated with Islamic extremism, was raided by British police in an investigation related to the hunt for the poison ricin. Seven men who were apparently living at the mosque were arrested, and a replica firearm[?], tear gas and a stun gun were reported as having been found on the premises. [3] (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2676481.stm)
  • As part of the plan to invade Iraq, British defence secretary Geoff Hoon announces that 26,000 British troops and equipment including 120 tanks will be sent to Kuwait, joining the 5,000 troops already on their way there. [4] (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2675101.stm)

January 18, 2003

January 17, 2003

January 16, 2003

January 15, 2003

January 14, 2003

  • War on terrorism: Three more suspects have been arrested in Manchester in England in connection with the investigation into ricin found in London, although it now appears as though the raid was initally carried out as the pursuance of an investigation into immigration issues. A Special Branch policeman, Stephen Oake, was fatally stabbed during the arrests, and three other officers were also injured, one seriously. This brings the total of those arrested to fourteen.
  • British humanitarian agency Care International[?] warns that the security situation in Afghanistan is "urgent" and warns that coalition troops should not redirect resources from security to nation-building efforts, as this could enable factional forces to overthrow the internationally backed government in Kabul. [7] (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/2656761.stm)
  • 20,000 workers at US industrial giant General Electric go on strike in 23 states over a GE plan to require workers to pay more for health insurance benefits. [8] (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2657557.stm)

January 13, 2003

  • War on terrorism: Six more suspects have been arrested in Bournemouth in England in connection with the investigation into ricin found in London. This brings the total of those arrested to eleven.

January 12, 2003

January 11, 2003

  • George Ryan[?], Governor of Illinois, announced that he commuted the sentences of all 157 people on the state of Illinois' Death Row[?] to life in prison. "Our capital system is haunted by the demon of error: error in determining guilt and error in determining who among the guilty deserves to die. What effect was race having? What effect was poverty having? Because of all these reasons, today I am commuting the sentences of all death row inmates," Ryan said. Ryan's term of office expires on January 13.
  • A U.S. court ordered the controversial organization Clonaid, which claims that it produced a human clone, to reveal the identity and whereabouts of the alleged cloned baby.

January 10, 2003

January 8, 2003

January 7, 2003

  • Jon Johansen was acquitted of all charges in the Norwegian DeCSS trial, in an important test case for copyright law.
  • War on Terrorism: British police announced details of the discovery of traces of the toxin ricin in a flat in Wood Green in North London in the wake of the arrest of 6 terrorist suspects. The timing of this news coincided with a major speech by Prime Minister Tony Blair dealing with the threat of terrorism and Britain's relationship with the U.S.A.
  • British Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon announced details of the call-up of reservists in the miltary build-up calculated to increase pressure on Iraq.
  • French President Jacques Chirac, in a New Year's message to French forces, stated that French forces should be prepare to be activated if the United Nations decides on military action in Iraq.
  • Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihaj Vajpayee[?] told an educational conference in Mumbai: "Our scientists are now talking of going to the Moon."
  • Astronomers at the Institute of Advanced Studies[?] at Princeton University have found the most distant extrasolar planet, OGLE-TR-56b, by a new technique of observing the intensity of light as a planet transits its sun, rather than by gravitational pertubation.

January 6, 2003

January 5, 2003

January 4, 2003

January 3, 2003

  • The Immigration and Naturalization Service of the United States proposes rules which will require all Americans traveling abroad to disclose detailed personal information both before leaving the country and before being permitted to re-enter the country. [12] (http://www.startribune.com/stories/1631/3571435)
  • In Bourake[?], Côte d'Ivoire, French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin met with political leaders of the Patriotic Movement of the Ivory Coast[?], who agreed to to participate in negotiations to be held in Paris, France, the week of January 15, 2003. However, two independent rebel groups in the west of the country, assisted by fighters from Liberia, have seized villages and the cocoa crops inside those villages, forcing residents to flee to the port of San Pedro with no possessions. One-fifth of the world's cocoa crop passes through San Pedro. A French unit is guarding the port.
  • U.S. plan to invade Iraq: United Nations arms inspectors from UMOVIC[?] have established a base of operations in Mosul, Iraq, 375 kilometers or 200 miles north of Baghdad, to speed the inspection process.
  • College football: At the Fiesta Bowl in Tempe, Arizona, the Ohio State University Buckeyes defeated the University of Miami (Florida) Hurricanes, 34-27, to win the national championship.
  • Journalist Geoff Mackley [13] (http://www.geoffmackley.com) reports after a helicopter mission that the Cyclone Zoe led to no casualties on the island of Tikopia[?], even though devastation was enormous. The 1,000 inhabitants of the island survived in caves. Reports that they had already resumed their daily occupations like fishing are misleading: they were "fishing" for their possesions that were blown out to sea. The situation on the island of Anuta[?] with 600 inhabitants is not known yet.

January 2, 2003

  • The first 49 of a promised 1,264 West African peacekeepers arrives at Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, to help supervise the cease-fire between the government of President Laurent Gbagbo and the main rebel group, the Patriotic Movement of the Ivory Coast[?]. Rebellion against the Gbagbo government began September 19, 2002. The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) agreed to send peacekeepers on September 29. The EECOWAS peacekeepers will join 2,500 French forces. Rebel groups occupy the northern half of Cote d'Ivoire.
  • French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin arrives in Cote d'Ivoire to help mediate the conflict.
  • Oil leakage from the sunken tanker Prestige threatens the southwestern coast of France. The prefect of Aquitaine reported a slick from the tanker is 50 kilometers (30 standard miles) from the coast. French Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin promised 50 million euros for the cleanup. The Prestige, which carried 77,000 tonnes of crude oil, sunk in late November, 2002, off the coast of the Galician region of Spain.
  • The Chinese Foreign Ministry reacted to a report in the Israeli newspaper Ha'aretz[?] which stated that Israel had complied with a U.S. request to suspend all contracts on the exports of arms and security equipment from China to Israel. Israeli Defence Ministry Director-General Amos Yaron[?] stated that Israel intends to "track down" all security ties with China. An unnamed senior Israeli official stated that the Americans were using the pretext of protecting Taiwan to cover a proposed shift of American policy to allow direct arms sales to China.
  • United States Army division commanders are beginning a war game[?] at V Corps headquarters at Heidelberg, Germany, called VICTORY SCRIMMAGE. The exercise is under the command of Lieutenant General William Wallace[?], who is expected to command American ground forces in a planned U.S. war against Iraq.
  • Clonaid Chief Executive Brigitte Boisselier told the French television station France 2[?] that the American parents of the supposed clone that Clonaid created are balking at provicing DNA evidence to prove that their new-born baby "Eve" is really a clone. The claim is that the parents are afraid that Florida will try to take the baby away from them.

January 1, 2003



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