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Night of the Living Dead

Night of the Living Dead is a seminal horror film directed by George Romero[?] which was to transfigure the horror-movie genre. The plot is simple and familiar to viewers even casually acquainted with the genre: the dead come to life and start attacking the living in order to feed upon their flesh.

Although a low budget film (it cost around $114,000 to produce) and helmed by a first-time director, the film is considered a horror classic by many film critics, and placed #93 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Thrills. It was shot in black and white, and employed such innovative cost saving special effects as using chocolate syrup as cinema blood.

The film comments slyly on racism in the United States and reverses a number of stereotypes. Perhaps the most sympathetic character is a young black man who takes refuge within a farm house.

Followed by two sequels; Dawn of the Dead (1980) and Day of the Dead (1984) and remade in 1990 by director Tom Savini[?]. In 1999 the original film was deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.



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