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Boeing 777

First taking to the air on June 14th, 1994, the Boeing 777 twin engine commercial airliner is manufactured by Boeing to meet the passenger capacity gap between the smaller 767 twinjet and the "Queen of the Skies" 747.

Boeing 777-200 (PP-VRB) of Brazilian airline Varig.
Larger version

The most recent major addition to Boeing's commercial airliner product line, the 777 is a technological marvel, featuring Boeing's first use of electronic fly-by-wire, a large flightdeck featuring multiple LCD instrument readouts, extensive use of composite materials, and the world's larget turbofan jet engines, each capable of over 74,000 pounds of thrust and measuring in excess of 13 feet in diameter. 305 passengers can be seated in the typical three-class arrangement onboard the 777-200.

Since its introduction, the 777 has appeared in the basic 777-200 model, the 777-200ER (an "Extended Range" version of the -200), and the 33-foot "stretched" 777-300, capable of a passenger capacity up to 390 in a three-class configuration. Boeing has plans for a 777-200LR ("Longer Range" beyond even the -200ER) as well as a 777-300ER edition, scheduled for flight tests in 2006.

The 777 competes with the Airbus A330 and A340 line of aircaft.

The Boeing 777-200 photo seen here was taken in August 2002 at London (Heathrow) Airport. The aircraft is landing. Distinguishing features of the 777 can be seen, including the set of six wheels on each main landing gear, and the blade-like rear tailcone.

General Characteristics

  • Cruise speed: 550 mph
  • Propulsion: Two General Electric GE90-90B High Bypass Ratio turbofan engines, rated at 90,000 pounds thrust each
  • Wingspan: 199 feet 11 inches



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