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All the President's Men

All the President's Men is a 1976 film based on the story of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein[?], the two journalists investigating the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. The film stars Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden[?], Martin Balsam[?], Hal Holbrook[?], Jason Robards[?], Jane Alexander, Meredith Baxter[?], Ned Beatty[?], Stephen Collins[?] and Penny Fuller[?].

The movie was adapted by William Goldman from the book by Carl Bernstein[?] and Bob Woodward. It was directed by Alan J. Pakula[?].

It won Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Jason Robards) and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Sound and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium. It was nominated for Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Jane Alexander), Best Director, Best Film Editing and Best Picture.

Much of the film uses dioptric lenses[?], which allow a "split screen" effect on a single take: each half of a shot can have its own focal length (that is, a man in the foreground can be in focus, yet on the other side of the frame, a man in the background can also be in focus--with objects between the two of them out of focus). Use of a dioptric lens requires a sharp dividing line to hide the effect; All the President's Men typically used pillars and desks for dividing lines.

The film also is an early film to make extensive use of different color temperatures in the same shot: for instance, at the beginning during the breakin, the light from inside is noticably orange, whereas the light from outside is noticably blue.

Famous quotes

"Goddammit, when is somebody going to go on the record in this story?! You guys are about to write a story that says the former Attorney General, the highest-ranking law enforcement officer in this country, is a crook! Just be sure you're right."

Judge: "Your names, please, and state your professions."
Barker: "Bernard Barker, anti-communist."
Judge: "Anti-communist? That, sir, is not your average profession."
McCord: "James McCord, security consultant."
Judge: "With?"
McCord: "Government, uh, recently, uh, retired."
Judge: "Where in the government?"
McCord: "Central Intelligence Agency."



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