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Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward (1943 - ) is one of the best-known journalists in the U.S., thanks largely to his work in helping uncover the Watergate scandal of President Richard Nixon while working as a reporter for the Washington Post newspaper.

He and colleague Carl Bernstein[?] were assigned to investigate the June 17, 1972 burglary of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee at Washington, D.C. office building called Watergate. Their work led to uncovering a large number of political "dirty tricks" used by Nixon to ensure his re-election. They won the Pulitzer Prize for reporting in 1973, and their book about the project, All the President's Men was a best-seller that was turned into a movie.

Since Watergate, Woodward has remained in the public eye by writing eight non-fiction books covering topics ranging from the U.S. Supreme Court to the death of comic John Belushi to preparations for the Iraq war inside the administration of President George W. Bush.

Woodward's writing style is very distinct and engaging. Prior to writing a book he tries to obtain the maxium amount of information on his subject, through interviews, documents, transcripts, and recordings. He then uses this information to re-create the event in the form of a fast-paced story with with present tense events and dialogue.

Born in Geneva, Illinois in 1943, and a graduate of Yale University, Woodward served in the United States Navy as a communications officer. He began his newspaper career with the Sentinel of Montgomery County, Maryland. He joined The Washington Post in 1971, and in 1981 became assistant managing editor for investigations.



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