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Stephen Fry

Stephen John Fry (born 24 August, 1957) is a well known British comedian, author and actor. Son of Alan and Marianne Fry.

He was educated at Stout's Hill, Uppingham and Queens' College, Cambridge[?], England. He lives in Norfolk, London, and New York City. He is an erstwhile collaborator of Hugh Laurie's.

Highlights of Fry's career include:

  • While still at boarding school, Fry absconded with a stolen credit card and, when apprehended, spent three months in prison for fraud.
  • He made an early television appearance on University Challenge while an undergraduate at Cambridge.
  • In 1984, he rewrote the script of the stage musical, Me and My Girl[?], which subsequently became a huge West End hit.
  • Due to make his debut on the West End stage in Simon Gray[?]'s play, Cell Mates, Fry suffered an attack of stage fright so serious that he ran away, leaving only an apology, and turning up some days later in Belgium.
  • He famously declared that he practised a celibate lifestyle (which he has since abandoned).

Table of contents

List of Works

  • TV scripts
    • A Bit of Fry and Laurie (1990)
    • A Bit More Fry and Laurie
    • Fry & Laurie #3
    • Three Bits of Fry and Laurie
    • Fry & Laurie Bit No. 4

Performances

Stephen Fry also narrates the audio versions of the Harry Potter books

Trivia The Stars' Tennis Balls contains several major characters whose names are anagrams or other simple mutations of their counterparts in The Count of Monte Cristo. For example:

Mercedes
Portia
pun
de Villefort
Oliver Delft
anagram
the Abbe (Faria)
the Babe (Fraser)
anagram (partial)
Fernand Mondego
Gordon Fendeman
anagram
Noirtier
Blackrow
translated literally
Capt. Leclere
Paddy Leclare
homonym
Caderousse
Cade, Rufus similar sound
Danglars
Garland
anagram (mostly)

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