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Some Like It Hot

Some Like It Hot is a 1959 comedy film which tells the story of two musicians, in the 1920s, who witness a murder, and disguise themselves as women in an all-girl orchestra in order to hide from the murderers. It stars Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, George Raft[?], Pat O'Brien[?], Joe E. Brown[?] and Nehemiah Persoff[?].

The movie was adapted by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond[?] from the story by Robert Thoeren[?] and M. Logan[?]. It was directed by Wilder, who was exasperated by Monroe's inability to remember her lines. He had several of them written in inconspicuous spots on the set, so she could read them. It has been reported that Monroe was pregnant during the filming of this movie, but there is no record of her ever having children or a miscarriage. Tony Curtis was famously quoted as saying that kissing Marilyn Monroe during the love scene in this movie was like "kissing Hitler," but he later denied it.

The movie has been acclaimed worldwide as one of the greatest movie comedies ever made (ranking #1 on the American Film Institute's list of "greatest comedies"), and it marked the peak of Monroe's career.

The film won an Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Black-and-White (Orry-Kelly[?]) and was nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Jack Lemmon), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White, Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, Best Director and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium. The film has also been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

"I'm a MAN!" - "Nobody's perfect."
Wilder paid tribute to three great gangster movies of the 1930s with subtle gags in the movie's script. The crimelord "Little Bonaparte" stems from Little Caesar, while Spats Columbo threatens to smash a grapefruit in the face of one of his henchmen (James Cagney's famous scene from The Public Enemy). He then grabs a coin from the air as it is being flipped by another gangster, a cliche that originated with Howard Hawks' Scarface.

In 1972, a musical play based on the movie, entitled Sugar, opened on Broadway, starring Elaine Joyce[?], Robert Morse[?], Tony Roberts[?] and Cyril Ritchard[?], with book by Peter Stone, lyrics by Bob Merrill[?], and music by Jule Styne.

In 2002, Tony Curtis performed in a stage production of the film, portraying the character originally played by Joe E. Brown.

Famous quotes:

Now you've done it!
Done what?
You tore off one of my chests!

I'm a man.
Nobody's perfect.



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