Encyclopedia > Selby Abbey

  Article Content

Selby Abbey

Selby Abbey is one of the relatively few surviving abbey churches of the medieval period, and, although not a cathedral, is one of the biggest. Like York Minster, the church rests on a base of sand and has suffered from subsidence. Many sections collapsed entirely during the 17th century, and further serious damage was done by a fire of 1906 which melted the bells in the central tower. Nevertheless, extensive rebuilding and refurbishment has made the church one of the most impressive in the country. The tower is Norman, but the eastern end is in Decorated Gothic[?] style, and the west front a mixture of Norman, Gothic and Victorian.

The interior bears some similarity to that of Durham Cathedral, on which the design was modelled. Richly-carved and moulded capitals are found throughout the church. A major feature is the east window, which contains original medieval glass and depicts the Tree of Jesse[?], a popular subject of that period. The chancel stonework is thought to have been designed by Henry Yevele[?].



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Islamic philosophy

... the theory of the intellect. The Peripatetics taught that the human soul was only an aptitude a faculty capable of attaining every variety of passive perfection and ...