Encyclopedia > Scooby-Doo

  Article Content

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You

Redirected from Scooby-Doo

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? (usually known as just Scooby-Doo) is an animated television show produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions in the 1970s, with various versions on the theme since. It is now a recurring feature on Cartoon Network.

The show features a dog named Scooby-Doo (voiced by Don Messick[?]) and four teenagers named Fred Jones (Frank Welker[?]), Daphne Blake (Stefanianna Christopherson[?] prior to 1970, Heather North[?] afterward), Velma Dinkley (Nicole Jaffe[?]), and Norville "Shaggy" Rogers (Casey Kasem). The five drive around in a van called the "Mystery Machine" and solve mysteries typically involving tales of ghosts and other supernatural forces. At the end of the episodes, the supernatural forces turn out to have a rational explanation.

The plot varied little from episode to episode, running as follows:

  • Our heroes turn up in their van, the "Mystery Machine", for some harmless reason
  • Their destination is suffering from a "ghost" or "monster" problem... which turns out to be a cover for criminal activity
  • The person in the ghost or monster suit turns out to be an apparently blameless authority figure who is unmasked by the Scooby Gang

In one season (1972-1973), the series includes a guest star in each episode. Notable guest stars included The Addams Family, Phyllis Diller[?], Jonathan Winters, Sonny and Cher, Tim Conway[?] and Jerry Reed[?].

Later incarnations of the series included Scooby's feisty nephew Scrappy-Doo and Scooby's dimwitted brother Scooby-Dum and female cousin Scooby-Dee.

The show is responsible for many pop-culture catchphrases, such as "Scooby Snacks" and "if it weren't for you meddling kids I'd have gotten away with it" (alternatively, "I would've got away with it if it wasn't for those pesky kids!") (traditionally said by the culprit when caught). The question of Velma's name (Velma or Thelma) has even been the subject of Internet polls.

Subsequent television shows and films often make reference to Scooby-Doo, for example Wayne's World and the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, in which Buffy and her monster-slaying friends refer to themselves as the "Scooby Gang" or "Scoobies", a knowing reference to Scooby-Doo. Even South Park paid homage to Scooby-Doo in an episode entitled Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery.

Having established a successful formula, Hanna-Barbera then shamelessly proceeded to repeat it ad infinitum. Goober and the Ghost Chasers, The Funky Phantom, Jabberjaw, Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels and Josie and the Pussycats (to name a few) all involve groups of kids solving mysteries, usually with the help of a wacky animal, ghost or caveman. Some of these shows even use the same voice actors.

In the fall of 2002 a new series of Scooby Doo adventures premired on the WB[?] Network. The show was called What's New Scooby Doo?

External Links



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
BBC News 24

... channel through their ordinary channels BBC1 and BBC2, using terrestrial signals, and this is seen by some as influential (to a certain limited extent) in promoting the ...

 
 
 
This page was created in 31.1 ms