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Pope Nicholas IV

Nicholas IV (Girolamo Masci) was pope from the February 22, 1288 to the April 4, 1292, a native of Ascoli[?] and a Franciscan monk, had been legate to the Greeks under Pope Gregory X in 1272, succeeded St Bonaventura[?] as general of his order in 1274, was made cardinal-priest of Sta Prassede and Latin Patriarch of Constantinople by Pope Nicholas III., cardinal-bishop of Palestina by Pope Martin IV., and succeeded Pope Honorius IV. after a ten-months' vacancy in the papacy.

He was a pious, peace-loving monk with no ambition save for the church, the crusades and the extirpation of heresy. He steered a middle course between the factions at Rome, and sought a settlement of the sicilian question. In May 1289 he crowned King Charles II of Naples and Sicily after the latter had expressly recognized papal suzerainty, and in February 1291 concluded a treaty with Alfonso III of Aragon and Philip IV of France looking toward he expulsion of James II of Aragon[?] from Sicily. The loss of Ptolemais[?] in 1291 stirred the pope to renewed enthusiasm for a crusade. He sent missionaries, among them the celebrated Franciscan missionary, John of Monte Corvino[?], to labour among the Bulgarians, Ethiopians, Tatars and Chinese.

He issued an important constitution on the 18th of July 1289, which granted to the cardinals one-half of all income accruing to the Roman see and a share in the financial management, and thereby paved the way for that independence of the college of cardinals which, in the following century, was to be of detriment to the papacy. Nicholas died in the palace which he had built beside Sta Maria Maggiore.

preceded by Pope Honorius IV, (1285-1287)
succeeded by Pope Celestine V, (1294)

From a 1911 encyclopedia



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