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Encyclopedia > Kevin O'Neill

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Kevin O'Neill

Kevin O'Neill is a British comic illustrator. He was born in London in 1953, and began working for the British publisher IPC at the age of 16. In 1976 he was working as a colorist on reprint magazines when he put in a transfer to the new science-fiction anthology magazine 2000 A.D.. On the first ever issue of this seminal British Sci-Fi Comic, the centre image of Tharg is by Mr O'Neill. Under the guidance of editor Pat Mills, O'Neill's irreverent hyper-kinetic style became a mainstay of the book, and he became one of the magazine's most popular creators.

Co-Creations of Mr O'Neill include the ABC Warriors and Nemesis the Warlock for 2000ad, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen with Alan Moore.

During the mid-1980s O'Neill's work began appearing in North America. He encountered numerous difficulties with censors who were aghast at the quirky yet apparently subversive nature of his artwork. He created the black comedy superhero title Marshall Law for Epic.

His most recent work is the continuing The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen with co-creator Alan Moore.

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Kevin O'Neill (b.1957-) is a basketball coach in the NCAA and the NBA. After tenures at Northwestern University, University of Tennessee[?] and Marquette[?], he became an assitant coach under Jeff Van Gundy[?] with the New York Knicks. Later he joined the Detroit Pistons since 2001 under former head coach Rick Carlisle[?], who was replaced by Larry Brown[?] despite winning 50 games and consecutive playoff appearances in those seasons.

O'Neill was hired in June 2003 as the head coach of the Toronto Raptors.



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