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Gansu

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Gansu (甘肅, pinyin gan1 su4, also Kansu) is a province located in the northwest of China. It lies between Qingzang, Inner Mongolia, and the Huangtu Plateaus, and borders Mongolia to the north. The Huang He river passes the the southern part of the province. It has a population of approximately 25 million (1997) and has a large concentration of Hui Chinese. The capital of the province is Lanzhou.

甘肅省
Gansu Sheng
Province Abbreviation(s): 甘 gan1 or 隴 long3
Capital Lanzhou
Area
 - Total
 - % water
Ranked 8th
390,000 km²
xx%
Population
 - Total (2002)
 - Density
Ranked 22th
25,620,000
65.7/km²
Administration Type Province

Table of contents

History

Geography

Gansu province has an area of 390,000 sq km, and the majority of its land is above 1 km over sea level. It lies between Qingzang, Inner Mongolia, and the Huangtu Plateaus, and borders Mongolia to the north. The Huang He river passes the the southern part of the province.

Neighboring provinces: Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Sichuan, Shanxi and Ningxia.

Cities:

Economy

Demographics

Gansu has a large concentration of Hui Chinese.

Culture

Within China, Gansu is known for its pulled noodles, and Muslim restaurants which feature authentic Gansu cusine are a common in most major Chinese cities.

Tourism

Places of Interest:

Postage Stamps

In August 1949, the provincial government overprinted the nondenominated stamps "locomotive" and "airmail arrow" stamps issued by the central government. These overprints were made by handstamping in purple, and are quite rare, valued at over US$500 each. Counterfeits are known, and apparent examples should be expertized[?].

Miscellaneous topics

External links



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