Encyclopedia > John Gotti

  Article Content

John Gotti

John Gotti (October 27, 1940 - June 10, 2002) (also known as "The Dapper Don" and "The Teflon Don") was the boss of the Gambino family[?], New York's largest mafia family, and one of the most feared.

Gotti has been implicated in the shooting of his predecessor as Gambino family boss, Paul Castellano, in 1985. Following his ascension to become the new Gambino family godfather, Gotti became known as "The Dapper Don", appearing in public in expensive hand tailored suits and reveling in media attention. Gotti was extremely popular in his Queens neighborhood, where he organized free lavish street parties and festivals, and had a reputation for keeping street crime out.

John Gotti was arrested several times throughout his career, becoming known as the "Teflon Don" in the media as he repeatedly avoided convictions. Gotti bribed or threatened jurors in several trials. He became something of a celebrity, and would frequently shake hands and pose for pictures with tourists outside the Ravenite Social Club in Manhattan where he conducted business.

Gotti and several associates were arrested in 1990. Gotti was convicted on April 2, 1992 for 14 counts of murder, conspiracy to commit murder, loansharking[?], racketeering[?], obstruction of justice, illegal gambling, and tax evasion[?] after his underboss, Sammy "The Bull" Gravano, turned state's evidence and testified against his boss. Gotti was sentenced to life in prison.

Gotti died of throat cancer on June 10, 2002 at the United States Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Missouri while serving life for criminal charges.



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Class Warfare

... first published in the UK by Pluto Press[?] in 1996. The contents runs as follows: Introduction Looking Ahead: Tenth Anniversary Interview (an interview conducted ...

 
 
 
This page was created in 30.9 ms