Encyclopedia > In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas

  Article Content

In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas

The Latin phrase in necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas, meaning "in certain things unity; in doubtful things liberty; in all things charity", is often misattributed to St. Augustine of Hippo, but seems to have been first used in the seventeenth century by a German Lutheran theologian called Rupertus Meldenius[?] in the form "in necesariis unita[s], in non-necessariis liberta[s], in utrisque charita[s], meaning "in certain things, unity; in uncertain things, liberty; and in both, charity". It is widely quoted in defence of theological and religious freedom.

External Link

'A common quotation from "Augustine"?' (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/jod/augustine/quote) -- A detailed history of the origin and interpretation of the phrase.



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Quackery

... side effects. Illegitimate treatments, e.g. herbal medicines, do not have these side effects -- they have no effect. Distrust of conventional medicine. Conventional ...

 
 
 
This page was created in 33.6 ms