Encyclopedia > Francois Rabelais

  Article Content

François Rabelais

Redirected from Francois Rabelais

François Rabelais (ca. 1493 - April 9, 1553) was a Renaissance writer, born in Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, France.

Rabelais was first an ordained priest but he left the monastery to study medicine. As a doctor, he used his spare time to write and publish humorous pamphlets which were critical of established authority and stressed his own perception of individual liberty. His revolutionary works, although satirical, revealed an astute observer of the social and political events unfolding during the first half of the sixteenth century.

Using a pseudonym, in 1532 he published his first book, titled Pantagruel[?] that would be the start of his successful Gargantua[?] series. In his book, Rabelais sang the praises of the wines from his hometown of Chinon through vivid descriptions of the eat, drink and be merry lifestyle. Despite the great popularity of his book, both it and his follow-up book were condemned by the academics at the Sorbonne for their unorthodox ideas and by the Roman Catholic Church for its derision of certain religious practices. Rabelais’ third book, published under his own name, was also banned.

With support from members of the prominent du Bellay family, Rabelais received the approval from King François I, to continue to publish his collection but after the death of the enlightened king, Rabelais was frowned upon by the academic elite and the French Parlement[?] suspended the sale of his fourth book.

François Rabelais left the country for several years before spending his last days in Paris.

Bibliography:

  • Pantagruel - 1532
  • La vie très horrifique du grand Gargantua[?] - 1534
  • Tiers Livre - 1546
  • Quart Livre - 1552
  • Two versions of a fifth book appeared after his death but how much of this work is that of Rabelais remains unknown.

External Link



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

... increasing responsibility for Germany to his brother Ferdinand while he concentrated on problems abroad. He had been fighting with the Ottoman Empire and i ...

 
 
 
This page was created in 28.3 ms