Encyclopedia > Euro banknotes

  Article Content

Euro banknotes

The euro (EUR or ) is the common currency for most European nations within the European Union. Euro banknotes and coins (see Euro coins) came into circulation on January 1, 2002, though the currency itself had been formally established on January 1, 1999.

There are seven different denominations, each having a distinctive colour and size. The design for each of them has a common theme of European architecture in various artistic periods. The front (or recto) of the note features windows or gateways while the back (or verso) has bridges. Common to all notes are the European flag, the initials of the European Central Bank in five versions (BCE, ECB, EZB, ΕΚΤ, EKP), a map of Europe on the back, the name "euro" in both Latin and Greek script and the signature of the current President of the ECB. The 12 stars of the EU are also incorporated into every note, with the design having been created by Austrian artist Robert Kalina.

Description of euro banknotes
Denomination Dimensions Dominant Colour Architecture Period Printercode position
5 euro | € 5
120 x 62 mm
Gray
Classical
< 5th century
left image edge (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f5)
10 euro | € 10
127 x 67 mm
Red
Romanesque
11-12th centuries
8 o'clock star (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f10)
20 euro | € 20
133 x 72 mm
Blue
Gothic
13-14th centuries
9 o'clock star (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f20)
50 euro | € 50
140 x 77 mm
Orange
Renaissance
15-16th centuries
right image edge (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f50)
100 euro | € 100
147 x 82 mm
Green
Baroque & Rococo
17-18th centuries
right of 9 o'clock star (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f100)
200 euro | € 200
153 x 82 mm
Yellow-brown
Iron & Glass
19-20th centuries
above 7 o'clock star (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f200)
500 euro | € 500
160 x 82 mm
Purple
Modern
20-21th centuries
9 o'clock star (http://www.eurotracer.net/information/notes.php?type=f500)

Depiction of euro banknotes
Front (recto, obverse)
Value
Back (verso, reverse)
€ 5
€ 10
€ 20
€ 50
€ 100
€ 200
€ 500

Unlike the euro coins, the euro notes do not have a national side indicating where they're from. This information is instead contained within the code on the back of the note. The first letter uniquely identifies the country the note was issued in, the remaining numbers (when added up and the digits of the resulting sum then added together again until a single digit remains) give a checksum also particular to that country. The W, K and J codes have been reserved for the EU member states currently not participating in the euro.

National identification codes
Code Country Checksum
Z
Belgium
9
Y
Greece
1
X
Germany
2
(W)
(Denmark)
(3)
V
Spain
4
U
France
5
T
Ireland
6
S
Italy
7
R
Luxembourg
8
(Q)
Not Used
(9)
P
Netherlands
1
(O)
Not Used
(2)
N
Austria
3
M
Portugal
4
L
Finland
5
(K)
(Sweden)
(6)
(J)
(United Kingdom)
(7)

Somewhat hidden on the front of the note is a second, smaller sequence where the first letter identifies the actual printer of the note. The printer code need not coincide with the country code, i.e. notes issued by a particular country may have been printed in another country (e.g. some Finnish notes have in fact been produced by a UK printer). The A, C and S codes have been reserved for printers currently not printing euro banknotes.

Printer identification codes
Code Printer Location Country
(A)
(Bank of England Printing Works) (Loughton[?]) (United Kingdom)
(B)
Not Used --- ---
(C)
(AB Tumba Bruk) (Tumba[?]) (Sweden)
D
Setec Oy Vantaa Finland
E
F. C. Oberthur Chantepie[?] France
F
Österreichische Banknoten und Sicherheitsdruck Vienna Austria
G
Johan Enschedé & Zn. Haarlem Netherlands
H
Thomas de la Rue Gateshead[?] United Kingdom
(I)
Not Used --- ---
J
Banca d'Italia Rome Italy
K
Central Bank of Ireland[?] Dublin Ireland
L
Banque de France[?] Chamalières[?] France
M
Fábrica Nacional de Moneda y Timbre Madrid Spain
N
Bank of Greece[?] Athens Greece
(O)
Not Used --- ---
P
Giesecke & Devrient Munich & Leipzig Germany
(Q)
Not Used --- ---
R
Bundesdruckerei Berlin Germany
(S)
(Danmarks Nationalbank[?]) (Copenhagen) (Denmark)
T
Banque Nationale de Belgique Brussels Belgium
U
Valora Carregado[?] Portugal

As from 2002, the individual national central banks (NCBs) are responsible for the production of one or two specific banknote denominations and will thus select the printing works. This decentralised pooling scheme means that the NCBs have to exchange the denominations produced in different locations prior to issue. [1] (http://www.ecb.int/change/eurobnfaq_en.htm)

External link



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Land-grant university

... a master's degree. See also: National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges Land-grant universities are governed in the United States and ...