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American Airlines flight 11

American Airlines flight 11 was one of four airplanes used in the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack; it was crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City.

This American Airlines morning flight from Boston to Los Angeles (BOS-LAX) was hijacked soon after take-off at 8:02 EDT on September 11, 2001. At 8:46 AM EDT the Boeing 767 was deliberately crashed into the north side of the north tower of the World Trade Center approximately between the 94 and 98 floors. The plane was carrying 81 passengers (including the 5 hijackers) and 11 crew. The hijacker who crashed the plane into the building is believed to be Mohammed Atta. All on board along with many hundreds in the building were killed and the tower later collapsed.

Some information about what had happened on board was sent by stewardesses on the plane. According to stewardesses Madeline Amy Sweeney and Betty Ong[?], three people, two stewardesses and a first class passenger, were stabbed or had their throats slashed by the hijackers. The first class area had been sequestered by the surviving crew and the rest of the passengers had been led to believe that a medical emergency was taking place in the first class area. The hijackers also used some kind of air spray to discourage entry into the first class area and the cockpit.

Although the impact itself caused extensive structural damage, it was the burning jet fuel[?] which is blamed for the structural failure of the world's 3rd tallest building. Many have speculated that this is the reason why the hijackers choose to use this fully fueled trans-continental flight.

The flight route designation was later changed from Flight 11 to Flight 25 out of respect for those who died in the attack.

See also: AA 11 flight manifest, September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack/Hijackers, United Airlines flight 175

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