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Universal plug-and-play

The goals of UPnP are to allow devices to connect seamlessly and to simplify the implementation of networks in the home and corporate environments. UpnP achieves this by defining and publishing UPnP device control protocols built upon open, Internet-based communication standards.

The UPnP architecture offers pervasive[?] peer-to-peer network connectivity of PCs of all form factors, intelligent appliances, and wireless devices[?]. The UPnP architecture is a distributed[?], open networking architecture that leverages TCP/IP and the World Wide Web to enable seamless proximity networking in addition to control and data transfer among networked devices in the home, office, and everywhere in between.

It enables data communication between any two devices under the command of any control device on the network.

  • Common base protocols. Base protocol sets are used, on a per-device basis.

  • User Interface[?] (UI) Control. UPnP architecture enables vendor control over device user interface and interaction using the web browser.

  • Operating system and programming language independence. Any operating system and any programming language can be used to build UPnP products. UPnP does not specify or constrain the design of an API for applications running on control points; OS vendors may create APIs that suit their customer's needs. UPnP enables vendor control over device UI and interaction using the browser as well as conventional application programmatic control.

  • Internet-based technologies. UPnP technology is built upon IP, TCP, UDP, HTTP, and XML, among others.

  • Programmatic control. UPnP architecture also enables conventional application programmatic control.

  • Extendable. Each UPnP product can have value-added services layered on top of the basic device architecture by the individual manufacturers.

The UPnP architecture supports zero-configuration, invisible, networking and automatic discovery for a breadth of device categories from a wide range of vendors, whereby a device can dynamically join a network, obtain an IP address, announce its name, convey its capabilities upon request, and learn about the presence and capabilities of other devices. DHCP and DNS servers are optional and are only used if they are available on the network. A device can leave a network smoothly and automatically without leaving any unwanted state information behind.

The foundation for UPnP networking is IP addressing. Each device must have a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client and search for a DHCP server when the device is first connected to the network.If no DHCP server is available, i.e., the network is unmanaged, the device must use Auto IP to get an address.If during the DHCP transaction, the device obtains a domain name, e.g., through a DNS server or via DNS forwarding, the device should use that name in subsequent network operations; otherwise, the device should use its IP address.

Given an IP address, Step 1 in UPnP networking is discovery. When a device is added to the network, the UPnP discovery protocol allows that device to advertise its services to control points on the network. Similarly, when a control point is added to the network, the UPnP discovery protocol allows that control point to search for devices of interest on the network. The fundamental exchange in both cases is a discovery message containing a few, essential specifics about the device or one of its services, e.g., its type, identifier, and a pointer to more detailed information. The UPnP discovery protocol is based on the Simple Service Discovery Protocol (SSDP).

Step 2 in UPnP networking is description. After a control point has discovered a device, the control point still knows very little about the device. For the control point to learn more about the device and its capabilities, or to interact with the device, the control point must retrieve the device's description from the URL provided by the device in the discovery message. The UPnP description for a device is expressed in XML and includes vendor-specific, manufacturer information like the model name and number, serial number, manufacturer name, URLs to vendor-specific Web sites, etc. The description also includes a list of any embedded devices or services, as well as URLs for control, eventing, and presentation. For each service, the description includes a list of the commands, or actions, the service responds to, and parameters, or arguments, for each action; the description for a service also includes a list of variables; these variables model the state of the service at run time, and are described in terms of their data type, range, and event characteristics.

Step 3 in UPnP networking is control. After a control point has retrieved a description of the device, the control point can send actions to a device's service. To do this, a control point sends a suitable control message to the control URL for the service (provided in the device description). Control messages are also expressed in XML using the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). Like function calls, in response to the control message, the service returns any action-specific values. The effects of the action, if any, are modeled by changes in the variables that describe the run-time state of the service.

Step 4 in UPnP networking is eventing. A UPnP description for a service includes a list of actions the service responds to and a list of variables that model the state of the service at run time. The service publishes updates when these variables change, and a control point may subscribe to receive this information. The service publishes updates by sending event messages. Event messages contain the names of one of more state variables and the current value of those variables. These messages are also expressed in XML and formatted using the General Event Notification Architecture (GENA). A special initial event message is sent when a control point first subscribes; this event message contains the names and values for all evented variables and allows the subscriber to initialize its model of the state of the service. To support scenarios with multiple control points, eventing is designed to keep all control points equally informed about the effects of any action. Therefore, all subscribers are sent all event messages, subscribers receive event messages for all evented variables that have changed, and event messages are sent no matter why the state variable changed (either in response to a requested action or because the state the service is modeling changed).

Step 5 in UPnP networking is presentation. If a device has a URL for presentation, then the control point can retrieve a page from this URL, load the page into a browser, and depending on the capabilities of the page, allow a user to control the device and/or view device status. The degree to which each of these can be accomplished depends on the specific capabilities of the presentation page and device.

See also

External links

http://www.upnp.org



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
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