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Six Flags

The Six Flags chain of amusement parks, which are also theme parks, began in 1961 with Six Flags over Texas[?], which featured (in the beginning) a Native American village, a cable-car ride, a railroad, some Wild West shows, and a stagecoach ride (and possibly Skull Island, a pirate-themed adventure attraction). There was also an excursion aboard "French" boats through a wilderness full of moving puppets. (Over time, all of those attractions, except for the railroad, would be replaced by other attractions, such as roller coasters, swing rides, log flume rides, and shoot-the-chute rides, as well as an observation tower.) The Six Flags chain grew with the acquisition of other parks, such as the Great Adventure Park and Safari in Jackson, New Jersey[?], and Great America, which had been independently founded. The chain of parks changed hands several times, being sold to the Penn Central Railroad, then to Bally Construction Corporation, and later on to the Warner Brothers company, among other owners. The chain is well-known in recent times for large and fast roller coasters, although the queue areas are often in the open air without much shading and without as many props as are typical for some queue areas in Walt Disney World.

There are many parks in the US, one in Canada and one in Mexico.

The Six Flags European Division parks include: Six Flags Belgium[?], Bellewaerde[?] park in Belgium, Walibi Lorraine[?], Walibi Aquitaine[?] and Walibi Rhône-Alpes[?] in France, Six Flags Holland in The Netherlands, Warner Bros. Movie World Germany[?] in Germany and Warner Bros. Movie World Madrid[?] in Spain.

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