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Political culture of Canada

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Canadian political culture is in some ways part of a greater North American and European political culture, which emphasizes constitutional law, limited religious freedom, limited personal liberty, and limited regional autonomy[?], these ideas stemming in various degrees from British common law[?], French civil law[?], North American aboriginal government[?], and the writings of US President Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson's ideal Republic?

Indeed, some have commented that Jefferson's ideal republic exists in Canada and has incorporated some of his most treasured ideas, such as regular constitutional review[?] (at least once in a generation, as Canada has historically done), neutrality in global matters (Canadian Prime Minister Lester Pearson[?] founded the United Nations Peacekeeping Missions[?] and Canada has contributed troops to literally every single UN peacekeeping effort), free public education (private universities are banned in Canada), and an economy based on agricultural productivity.

Is Canada subservient to America?

It is sometimes argued that Canada and the United States have a marriage-like relationship, in which Canada plays a traditional role as cautious housewife, and America is an arrogant world-conquering cowboy. Such imagery is evident in various Canadian political cartoons.

See also: Political culture:United States, US-Canada relations[?], US-Canada politics compared, Political culture:Quebec, and etc.



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