Encyclopedia > Oliver Goldsmith

  Article Content

Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith (1730 - April 4, 1774) was an Irish writer and physician known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield[?] (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village[?] (1770) (written in memory of his brother), and his plays The Good-natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1773).

He was the son of an Anglican cleric and earned his Bachelor of Arts in 1749 at Trinity College, Dublin, studying theology and law but never getting as far as ordination. He later studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Leiden, then toured Europe, living on his wits. On his return, he settled in London, where he worked as an apothecary[?]'s assistant. Perennially in debt, Goldsmith had a massive output as a hack writer for the publishers of London, but his few painstaking works earned him the company of Samuel Johnson, along with whom he was a founder member of "The Club".

Other Works

  • The Citizen of the World (1762)
  • The Traveller (1764)

See Auburn, for the influence of "The Deserted Village".

References



All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

 
  Search Encyclopedia

Search over one million articles, find something about almost anything!
 
 
  
  Featured Article
Figure skating

... side by side. Other elements include throw jumps, in which the male skater 'throws' the female into a jump, usually a salchow or axel; lifts, in which the female is held ...