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Heimdall

Heimdall ("pole of the world") is one of the gods in the Norse Mythology. He is the guardian that is to blow the Giallar horn if a danger approaches Asgard. His senses are so acute that he can hear the grass grow and he can see to the end of the world; he also required very little sleep. He is moreover the guardian of the Bifrost Bridge.

During Ragnarok, Heimdall was destined to kill and be killed by Loki.

He was a god of light, son of nine different mothers (the children of either Geirrendour or Aegir, called billow maidens). His hall was called Himinbjorg and his horse was Gultopp.

Another name for Heimdall is Rig ("ruler") as well as Gullintani ("gold tooth" -- he had golden teeth).

As Rig, Heimdall participated in the creation of mankind. Rig was travelling and happened upon a farm. It was owned by Ai and Edda. They offered Rig shelter and a low quality meal. He slept between the pair at night; Edda gave birth nine months later to a son whom they named Thrall. Thrall grew up strong and ugly. He married Thir and had twelve sons and nine daughters. They became the serfs of Norse society.

On his second journey, Rig came across a nice house owned by a craftsman and a farmer, Afi and Amma. The food was mediocre and they once again let him sleep between them. Nine months later, a son, Karl, was born. He married Snör and they had twelve sons and ten daughters, becoming the ancestors of the peasants of Norse society.

On his third trip, Rig came to a mansion inhabited by Fadir and Modir. They gave him excellent food and, nine months later, Modir gave birth to a beautiful baby named Jarl. Rig taught Jarl runes and other magic, as well as the language of the birds. Jarl then gathered some men and captured some land, then married Erna, with whom he had eleven sons, the ancestors of the warriors in Norse society.

Alternate: Heimdallr (Old Norse)



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