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Flags of the Confederate States of America

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The Bonnie Blue Flag

Originating in Florida in the early 1800s, the Bonnie Blue Flag was the unofficial first flag of the Confederate States of America, the South united under one star.

The Stars and Bars, "The" Confederate Flag

This flag was flown from 4 March 1861 to May 1863 as the official flag of the seven states that seceded from the Union. Later six more states joined them. It caused confusion on the battlefield because it was so similar to the Stars and Stripes of the Union forces. If any flag can be called "the" Confederate flag, this is it.

The Stainless Banner

This was the second official flag of the Confederacy, brought into service on 1 May 1863. When the battlefield was windless, it was mistaken for a flag of surrender because all that could be seen was the field of white.

The Third National Banner

This is the third official flag, adopted 4 March 1865, very shortly before the fall of the Confederacy.

The Battle Flag

The battle flag of the Confederacy is square, usually 3×3 feet. It was used in battle from May 1863 to the fall of the Confederacy. The blue color on the Southern Cross in the battle flag was navy blue, as opposed to the much lighter blue of the Naval Jack.

The Naval Jack

The Confederate Navy Jack is rectangular, usually about 5×3 feet. The blue color in the Southern Cross is much lighter than in the Battle Flag, and it was flown only on Confederate ships from 1863 to 1865. This flag is what is typically (though erroneously) recognized as the Confederate flag.



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