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Finnish Jaeger troops

The Jäger troops were volunteers from Finland in Germany trained to Jaegers during World War I. It was one of many means of Germany's with the intention to weaken Russia and to facillitate Russia's loss of western provinces and dependencies.

The recruitement of the Jäger volunteers from the Russian Grand Duchy of Finland had to be secret, and was dominated by the most Germany-influnced circles, such as university students and the upper middle class. The recruitement was however in no ways exclusive.

The recruits were transported across Finland's western border via Sweden to Germany, where the volunteers were formed into the Royal Prussian 27th Jäger Battallion. The Jäger Battallion participated in the ranks of the German Army from 1916 in the battles on the northern flank of the eastern front.

After the outbreak of the Civil War in Finland those of the Jägers were released, who intended to engage on the "White" (non-Socialist) side in the war. In Finland, these 2,000 volunteers were simply called The Jägers.

Their contribution to the White victory was crucial, not the least morally. Educated as elite troops[?] they were also fit to assume command as officers over the untrained and uneducated troops of the Civil War.

Immediately after the Civil War, they were afforded the right to use the word Jäger in their military ranks. Many of the Jägers continued their military careers. In the 1920s a long feud between officers with Jäger-background and Finnish officers who had served in the Russian Tsarist army was concluded in favor of the Jägers: Most of the commanders of army corps, divisions and regiments in the Winter War were Jägers. The Jäger March composed by Jean Sibelius to the words written by the Jäger Heikki Nurmio, was the honorary march of many army detachments.



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