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E. M. Forster

Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970), English novelist.

Born in London, son of an architect. He was to have been named Henry, but was baptised Edward by accident.

He attended Tonbridge[?] School in Kent. At King's College, Cambridge in 1901, he became involved with a group known as the Cambridge Conversazione Society. Many of its members went on to form the Bloomsbury group, of which Forster was also a member. Forster was also a member of an informal group of gay intellectuals which included Siegfried Sassoon and J. R. Ackerley.

He travelled in Egypt, Germany and India. Died on June 7 in Coventry.

Table of contents

Works

Novels

Short Stories

  • The Celestial Omnibus (and other stories) 1911
  • The Eternal Moment (and other stories) 1928
  • Collected Short Stories (1947) - a combination of the above two titles, containing:
    • The Story of A Panic
    • The Other Side Of The Hedge
    • The Celestial Omnibus
    • Other Kingdom
    • The Curate's Friend
    • The Road From Colonus
    • The Machine Stops
    • The Point Of It
    • Mr Andrews
    • Co-ordination
    • The Story Of The Siren
    • The Eternal Moment
  • The Life to Come (and other stories) 1972 (posthumous)
 

Plays

  • England's Pleasant Land 1940

Libretto

Essays

  • Alexandria: A History and Guide 1922
  • Pharos and Pharillon (A Novelist's Sketchbook of Alexandria Through the Ages) 1923
  • Aspects of the Novel 1927
  • Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson 1934
  • Abinger Harvest 1940
  • Two Cheers for Democracy 1951
  • The Hill of Devi 1953
  • Marianne Thornton, A Domestic Biography 1956
  • Commonplace Book 1987 (posthumous)

External Links



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