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Gary Gygax

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Ernest Gary Gygax (born 1938) is perhaps best known for co-creating, with Don Kaye[?], one of the most well-known role playing games Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). He is also the author of the Gord the Rogue series.

Gygax and Kaye started founded publishing company Tactical Studies Rules (TSR) and published the first version of D&D in 1974. As of 2003, Gygax continues to take an active role in D&D, and writes a section in Dragon Magazine.

Another of his creations was DragonChess, a three-dimensional fantasy chess variant, published in Dragon Magazine #100 (August 1985). It is played on three 8x12 boards stacked on top of each other - the top board represents the sky, the middle is the ground, and the bottom is the underworld. The pieces are characters and monsters inspired by the Dungeons and Dragons setting: King, Mage, Paladin, Cleric, Dragon, Griffin, Oliphant, Hero, Thief, Elemental, Basilisk, Unicorn, Dwarf, Sylph and Warrior.

After leaving TSR Gygax created Dangerous Journeys which was an advanced RPG spanning multiple genres. He began work in 1995 on a major new RPG, originally intended for a computer game, but in 1999 released as Lejendary Adventure which some consider to be his best work to date. A key part of its design was to keep the gaming rules as simple as possible, as Gygax felt that RPGs were becoming too complex and discouraged new users.

Novels

  • Saga of Old City (1985)
  • Artifact of Evil (1986)
  • City of Hawks (1987)
  • Night Arrant collection (1987)
  • Sea of Death (1987)
  • Come Endless Darkness (1988)
  • Dance of Demons (1988)
  • The Anubis Murders (1992)
  • The Samarkand Solution (1993)
  • Death in Delhi (1993)



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