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Dub music

Dub is a form of Jamaican music (see music of Jamaica) which developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, in many ways parallel with hip hop in the United States (see music of the United States). It is characterized by being a "version" of an existing song, typically having an extended percussive beat, and being drenched in spring reverb, echo and delay, with the emphasis on removing or altering layers of the original track as well as the bassline. Sometimes the track is overlaid with a "toaster" singing heavily-rhymed and alliterative lyrics, or the dub version may be instrumental. The music also tends to feature slow and heavily reverberated metallic or industrial sound effects.

See in particular the works of Lee Perry, King Tubby (Osbourne Ruddock) and Augustus Pablo for the very best in dub music in the 1970s. In the 80's Britain became a new center for dub production with Mad Professor[?] and Jah Shaka[?] being the most famous, while Scientist became the heavyweight champion of Jamaican dub. In the 1990s and beyond dub has been influenced by and in turn influenced both techno and dance music and hip hop, with many dub tracks produced by non traditional musicians from these other genres, traditional dub has however survived see Aba Shanti-I, for example and some of the originators like Lee Perry and Mad Professor continue to produce new material.



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