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Springtail

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Springtails
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Order: Collembola
Families
Suborder Arthropleona
  Superfamily Entomobryoidea
   Entomobryidae[?] - slender springtails
   Isotomidae[?] - smooth springtails
   Oncopoduridae[?]
   Paronellidae[?]
   Tamoceridae[?]
  Superfamily Poduroidea
   Brachystomellidae[?]
   Hypogastruridae[?] - elongate-bodied springtails
   Neanuridae[?]
   Odontellidae[?]
   Onychiuridae[?] - blind springtails
   Poduridae[?] - water springtails
Suborder Symphypleona
   Dicyrtamidae[?]
   Katiannidae[?]
   Sminthuridae[?] - globular springtails
   Sminturididae[?]

Springtails (Order Collembola) form the largest of the three orders of modern Hexapods that are no longer considered to be insects. The three orders are sometimes grouped together in a class called Endognatha because, unlike the insects, they have internal mouth parts. However they do not appear closer related to one another than they do to the insects. Recent genetic studies suggest that the Collemba are a separate evolutionary line from the other Hexapoda.

Members of this order have six or fewer abdominal segments. These tiny animals are less than 6 mm in length. An abdominal tail-like appendage, called the furcula, in some species is folded beneath the body, and is used for jumping. Springtails are frequently found in leaf litter and other decaying material. The suborder Arthropleona has an elongated body in contrast to the more globular body of the Symphyleona.

Reference
http://www.itis.usda.gov
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/2928345.stm
TSN: 99237
TSN Arthropleona: 99238



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