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Archbishop of Trier

The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. It encompassed territory along the Moselle River between Trier, near the French border, and Koblenz on the Rhine. The Archbishop of Trier was traditionally an Imperial Elector[?], and held the honorary office of Archchancellor of Gaul (here taken to mean the Kingdom of Arles[?], or Burgundy, along with Germany and Italy one of the three component kingdoms of the Empire).

Unlike the other Rhenish Archbishoprics, Mainz and Cologne, which were raised to archepiscopal status during the Carolingian period, Trier, as the important Roman city of Augusta Treverorum, had been home to an Archbishop since Roman times.

From 1795, the territories of the Archbishopric on the left bank of the Rhine (i.e. almost all of it) were under French occupation, and were annexed in 1801. In 1803, what was left of the Archbishopric was secularized and annexed by the Princes of Nassau.

Archbishops of Trier, 273-1803

  • Ravitus 273-282
  • Marcellus 282-287
  • Severinus 287-308
  • Florentius 308-309
  • Martin II 309-310
  • Maximinus I 310-322
  • Valentinus 322-327
  • Agrippinus 1327-1335
  • Maximinus II 1335-1352
  • Paulinus 353-358
  • Bonosus 359-365
  • Vetranius 365-384
  • Felix II 384-398
  • Mauritius II 398-407
  • Leontius 407-409
  • Auctor II 409-427
  • Severus 428-455
  • Cyrillus 455-457
  • Iamblichus 457-458
  • Evemerus 458-461
  • Marcus II 461-465
  • Volusianus 465-469
  • Miletius 469-476
  • Modestus 476-479
  • Maximianus 479-499
  • Fibicius 500-526
  • Aprunentius 526-527
  • Nicetius 527-566
  • Rusticus II 566-573
  • Magnerich 573-596
  • Gundwich 596-600
  • Sibald 600-626
  • Modoald 626-645
  • Numerianus 645-665
  • Hildulf 665-671
  • Basinus 671-697
  • Ludwin 697-718
  • Milo 718-758
  • Wermad 758-791
  • Richbod 791-804
  • Waso 804-809
  • Amalhar 809-814
  • Hetto 814-847
  • Dietgold 847-868
  • Barthold 869-883
  • Radbod 883-915
  • Rudgar 915-930
  • Rudbrecht 930-956
  • Heinrich I 956-964
  • Dietrich I 965-977
  • Egbert 977-993
  • Ludolf 994-1008
  • Megingod 1008-1015
  • Poppo 1016-1047
  • Eberhard 1047-1066
  • Kuno I 1066
  • Udo 1066-1078
  • Egilbert 1079-1101
  • Bruno 1101-1124
  • Gottfrid 1124-1127
  • Meginher 1127-1130
  • Adalberon von Munsterol 1131-1152
  • Hillin von Fallemanien 1152-1169
  • Arnold I 1169-1183
  • Fulmar 1183-1189
  • Johann I 1189-1212
  • Dietrich von Wied 1212-1242
  • Arnold II von Isenburg 1242-1259
  • Heinrich I von Finstingen 1260-1286
  • Bohemond I von Warnesberg 1286-1299
  • Diether von Nassau 1300-1307
  • Heinrich III von Virneburg 1300-1306 (in opposition)
  • Baldwin von Luxemburg 1307-1354
  • Bohemond II von Saarbrücken 1354-1361
  • Kuno II von Falkenstein 1362-1388
  • Werner von Falkenstein 1388-1418
  • Otto von Ziegenhain 1418-1430
  • Rhaban von Helmstadt 1430-1438
  • Jakob von Sierk 1439-1456
  • Johann II of Baden 1456-1503
  • Jakob II of Baden 1503-1511
  • Richard Greiffenklau zu Vollraths 1511-1531
  • Johann III von Metzenhausen 1531-1540
  • Johann Ludwig von Hagen 1540-1547
  • Johann IV von Isenburg 1547-1556
  • Johann V von der Leyen 1556-1567
  • Jakob III von Eltz 1567-1581
  • Johann VI von Schonenberg 1581-1599
  • Lothar von Metternich 1599-1623
  • Philipp Christoph von Sotern 1623-1652
  • Karl Kaspar von der Leyen 1652-1676
  • Johann Hugo von Orsbeck 1676-1711
  • Charles Joseph Ignace of Lorraine 1711-1715
  • Franz Ludwig of Palatinate-Neuburg 1716-1729
  • Franz Georg von Schönborn-Buchheim 1729-1756
  • Johann Philipp von Walderdorf 1756-1768
  • Clemens Wenzel of Saxony 1768-1803



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